State should seize the moment to move boldly on transportation

Gutting the T is no way to chart a visionary path

Re “Massachusetts needs a strong transportation vision — and a leader who can carry it out” (Editorial, Feb. 7): The stars are indeed aligning, providing a unique opportunity to leverage both state and federal resources to address the state’s longstanding transportation challenges. But how can we take advantage of this opportunity if the Baker administration and MBTA leadership are dedicated to gutting the T’s budget and services?

Read the full article at The Boston Globe

Put an end to cuts at the MBTA

LAST FALL, when the MBTA announced it was planning deep cuts to bus, train, ferry ,and commuter rail service, the opposition was swift and virtually unanimous Riders, workers, elected officials, and employers raised the alarm that T cuts would make it harder for essential workers to get to their jobs, worsen unemployment, disproportionately impact low-income people and communities of color, and take a deep and unnecessary toll on our region’s economic future. Unlikely allies joined in the insistence that T service is simply too important to cut. But the calls to stop cuts and make the T more affordable have not moved the Baker/Polito administration and the T executives under their authority.

Read the full article in CommonWealth Magazine

MA; Officials pressure MBTA to lay off service cuts as board plans vote

Dec. 14—Transit advocates aren’t backing down from the fight against a series of sweeping cuts to bus, subway and commuter rail services subject to a Monday vote that MBTA officials say are necessary to make up for lost revues amid the pandemic. 

“It’s clear that millions of Greater Boston residents oppose these MBTA cuts,” said Lee Matsueda, executive director of Community Labor United, the lead convener of the Public Transit Public Good coalition. “Our research shows that more than 70% of residents are concerned about the impact the cuts will have on safety for riders and workers.”

Read the full article in Mass Transit Magazine

Junta de la MBTA decidirá si se realizan recortes el lunes

Se espera que la junta de la MBTA votara sobre los recortes de servicios propuestos que limitarían severamente algunas de sus ofertas de transporte público en medio de la pandemia, el lunes, a medida que crecen los pedidos de que la agencia cambie sus planes.

Se esperaba que la Junta de Control Fiscal y de Gestión de MBTA votara sobre los recortes durante una reunión a las 12 p.m.

 

Read the full article in Telemundo

Officials pressure MBTA to lay off service cuts as board plans vote

Transit advocates aren’t backing down from the fight against a series of sweeping cuts to bus, subway and commuter rail services subject to a Monday vote that MBTA officials say are necessary to make up for lost revues amid the pandemic.

“It’s clear that millions of Greater Boston residents oppose these MBTA cuts,” said Lee Matsueda, executive director of Community Labor United, the lead convener of the Public Transit Public Good coalition. “Our research shows that more than 70

Read the full article in The Boston Herald

MBTA service will be cut significantly in early 2021

The Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority will curtail service next year after the agency’s oversight board finalized a plan Monday to reduce subway frequencies and eliminate weekend commuter rail trains on several lines in response to low ridership during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The package, approved 3-2 by the MBTA’s Fiscal and Management Control Board, is more limited in scope than a plan the agency had presented in November that frustrated advocates and political leaders, but still represents a considerable reduction in service.

 

Read the full article in The Boston Globe

MBTA Board OKs Cuts to Bus Routes, Weekend Commuter Rail and More

Significant MBTA service cuts will hit early next year after the agency’s oversight board voted 3-2 in favor of the amended plan Monday afternoon, capping off months of planning and public outcry.

The Fiscal and Management Control Board approved virtually all of the changes that T staff proposed, making only a handful of tweaks aimed at keeping some commuter rail service after 9 p.m. possible, setting a target date for determining if the agency needs to increase service, and ensuring that fare hikes will not factor into upcoming T budget deliberations.

Read the full article in NBC Boston

The MBTA is changing its plan to impose service cuts next year. Here’s how.

Following a public backlash, the MBTA is rolling back some of its proposed service cuts in response to the pandemic-induced budget crisis — at least for now.

According to the new plan presented Monday, buses and subways will continue to run past midnight until 1 a.m., partial ferry and weekend commuter rail service will be maintained, and trolleys on the Green Line’s E branch will keep going all the way to Heath Street. Fewer bus routes would be suspended and Blue Line service wouldn’t be reduced as much as other rapid transit lines.

Read the full article in Boston.com

MBTA signals it will scale back systemwide service cuts

A report released by labor advocates on Monday also estimated the MBTA’s original plan to reduce service would result in about 800 layoffs, counting employees with the MBTA and the contractors who operate the commuter rail and ferry, as well as parking and customer service positions. 

Read the full article in The Boston Globe

Vote on MBTA Service Cuts Delayed Amid Criticism From Boston Mayor, Others

“I’m confident that this Congress, along with the new president coming in, will pass legislation to deal with transit. Transit has to be addressed in this country. We have crumbling roads and bridges all across America,” Walsh said. “If we don’t address that issue on a national level, infrastructure will crumble, and what type of country will be then?” Community Labor United Executive Director Lee Matsueda supported Walsh’s argument.

“We have to allow time for relief and funding from the federal government to roll out support for the T. We can’t jump to conclusions and make cuts that are going to be disastrous for our communities,” 
Matsueda said. “We have to allow time for the vaccine we have to protect opportunity for economic recovery.”

Walsh also referenced a recent study from the union-backed coalition, 
Public Transit Public Good, which estimated more than 800 jobs could be eliminated if the MBTA moves ahead with the service cuts.

“It’s simply reckless to be making these cuts on a budget for FY22 with everything that’s going on, especially when the impact is the greatest on those communities that have been hit hard by the pandemic,” Matsueda said.

Read the full article on NBC Boston